Is anti-diet the right way to approach health, wellness, and well-being?

Some front runners in this movement teach the WTH attitude. Which is NOT the answer either. That is the kind of thinking that keeps people stuck. In many ways it gives wrong idea about eating, and living life in general. Self-control is displayed as being a form of slavery. Instead, you’re encouraged to throw all caution to the wind, and do whatever the heck you feel like. 

Instead we ought to approach our well-being from a place of mindfulness and responsibility. Sometimes it means making the hard call, delaying gratification, so  you can grow into that next level version of yourself.

Throwing the middle finger up at the idea that self-control and discipline creates a sense of why even try? Apathy is not empowerment. Taking ownership is empowering–so long as you do it on your own terms. And not according to what you ‘think’ you should be doing.

 

 You know dieting doesn’t work

You just want to be healthy, but somehow you’re still struggling to make those new lifestyle habits stick.

If dieting isn’t the answer. What is? Initially it seems like it would be the opposite–not dieting. But that is scary right? For most of us, dieting in some way is all we have known. Dieting nonsense is everywhere in our culture these days.

 We’ve never really been taught how to eat when we aren’t operating from a diet mindset or with diet behaviors. 

 We all want to feel at ease around food and feel comfortable in our skin.

Whether it’s from a shallow place of  wanting to look good, or because of a deeper desire we have to feel like we are lovable, worthy, and good enough.

On the surface, most of us would say we know what it takes to reach our health goals–eat less, move more. No matter how many times we’ve tried this and have failed, we still carry this as our own failure. Not the diet itself.

 We try to fit ourselves into a box we were never meant to be in. We were created to be unique–that includes the formula for our healthy lifestyle too. My healthy lifestyle won’t necessarily look the same as yours, and that is ok. 

 About 18 months ago, I realized I was still dieting, yet calling it a “healthy lifestyle”.

I was operating by rules and restriction.

I wasn’t losing weight (long-term). I was obsessed with food all the time again. Even though I was working out 6 days a week, my body didn’t lose weight. 

 

Maybe time to do something different

What are you currently doing? How is that working for you? If it’s not working, it’s time to shake things up and do something you’ve never done before.

I’m willing to bet you’ve had seasons in life where you’ve said screw it, and have eaten whatever you wanted, and that didn’t get you what you wanted either. While I’m not proposing that we just go totally off the rails. I am proposing we find our own happy middle ground. 

 Look at ditching the diet mindset in a mindful way.

Neutralize food.

Give yourself permission to eat anything you want.

Toss out the food rules.

Get in touch with yourself.

Ask yourself these questions:

What do you want to look, feel, be like?

How do you want to engage with food and your body?

How do you want to feel in your skin? 

Guess what you can have those feelings now. You can have that relationship with food right now. 

Diet culture is everywhere you turn

I had to overcome years of dieting and living in diet culture. Sometimes it is near impossible to sort it all out.

When I first started my own non-diet journey, I went way off the rails. Gained weight, didn’t feel good. I knew I was self-sabotaging, but this time it was my fault. You see when we diet, and it doesn’t work–sure we feel pretty bad about ourselves for failing, but ultimately we still get to blame the diet for not working. 

When you go off the rails on purpose, and you initially start to leave dieting behind it will feel out of control. That is all the years of dieting and listening to the diet BS catching up with you. This is normal. No need to panic. And you definitely don’t need to go back to dieting.

 It’s a slow process. One that needs practicing every day. You may get to a point where you realize you aren’t happy with how you’ve been treating yourself (which by the way can and does STILL happen when you’re dieting).

When you’re recovering from the diet mindset there is an adjustment period. It will take you some time to learn this new way of eating and interacting with food.

But it gets better.

The rebel who just wants to eat everything doesn’t have to rule your world.

Instead, you learn how to channel into your inner guide and expert. You use her to guide you to the right decisions for yourself. Of course having some key habits under your belt will help until it becomes more automatic.

Where the anti-diet movement fails you

Some in the anti-diet movement will tell you to just keep going. Eat whatever you want how ever much you want.

It’s a ‘who cares’ attitude. This is irresponsible and doesn’t empower anybody. Maybe it feels like empowerment temporarily, but not long term. 

 Rejecting the anti-diet mindset is as important as rejecting the diet mindset.

When you finally step into the role of expert in your own life,  you take full ownership of your life and your results that is when you find TRUE freedom.

I had to teeter to both extremes to figure that out.

 The ironic thing? In both extremes I was unhappy.

One is the mindset you’ll never be good enough, the other says you can be whatever you want even if it costs you your health and the ability to manage yourself in a healthy, helpful way.

Finding your own center will help you walk through life with self- control, discipline, grace and self-compassion. That, my friend is the only way to live the life you were created to live.

If you’re ready to simplify nutrition and leave dieting behind click here to apply for my new group coaching program. Space is limited, and the early bird discount won’t last long…